News

News

519.t1.jpg Haus Gallery's XLI art classics auction - Champion returned home and set a record

On Friday, April 21 the 41st art classics auction took place in the Haus Gallery. Amongst other works also the sculpture called „Champion“ by Amandus Adamson was sold, that meaning the long lost cultural value to return and stay in the homeland. The hammer price – 57 200 euros – is gallery’s auction record of post Estonian Kroon times.

On the picture: Amandus Adamson. Champion (Georg Lurich)

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518.t1.jpg How to evaluate artistic photography? The nine lives of gold medallist Tõnu Noorits

Kaupo Kikkas, photographer

Photographer Tõnu Noorits is a great example of dedication to photography. With his works and artistic achievements Noorits convinces us to take a real look at the art of photography. To see its aesthetic capacity in delivering a message that is deeper than just a moment captured in time. Noorits has been thoroughly engaged with a very wide range of topics in photography. His staged photography deserves a special mention in its simultaneous spontaneity and organisation.

On the picture: Tõnu Noorits. A Little Cyclist

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515.t1.jpg Eduard Wiiralt. Scene on the Street

Järvi Pust, gallerist at Haus Gallery

Eduard Wiiralt (1898–1954) had been away from Estonia for six years by 1931. Most of that time was spent in Paris and near it, if one does not count the three-week trip to Italy. The pulse of big city life, contact with other artists and never-ending work in very different techniques had by that time moulded him into a technically skilled artist with a sharp eye and a sensible nerve, about whom the French author and art critic André Salmon has written: “Astonishing graphic artist, not recognised so much by his courage in topics but rather the rare ability to fend off the opportunities.” This quote also nicely characterises the human nature of Wiiralt and the complexity of being an artist. 

On the picture: Eduard Wiiralt. Scene on the Street.

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516.t1.jpg Paul Burman. Landscape with a Fisherman

Järvi Pust, gallerist at Haus Gallery

Paul Burman (1888–1934), the brother of Karl Burman Senior, obtained artistic training from such numerous and different sources that it would have been sufficient for several people. After graduating from Tallinn Secondary School of Science (then called Tallinn Peter’s School of Science), he studied at the atelier class of Ants Laikmaa, took classes in the St. Petersburg Academy of Arts in the animal painting class of Roubaud and educated himself further in Moscow, Riga and Paris. When studying his work in-depth, one can find traces and symbols of what he learned from each of these schools, but, first and foremost, the reflections of an artist with a unique view of the world, depicting what he has experienced and lived though. Regardless of the topic matter of the work, he is recognisable by his sensitive, but bold brush strokes and art historians have dubbed him both the first Estonian impressionist and animalist.

On the picture: Paul Burman. Landscape with a Fisherman

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517.t1.jpg Raivo Korstnik. Red Kunda

Järvi Pust, gallerist at Haus Gallery

Raivo Korstnik (1932–1992) is definitely a phenomenon by himself on the Estonian art scene. Precisely “by himself”, as on one side he was known and respected in the art circles, but on the other, the exhibitions he participated in during his lifetime can be counted on one hand. Having graduated from the State Art Institute of the Estonian SSR in 1957, in addition to his creative work he was active in several fields that were connected, in one way or another (either as an artist at Estonian National Television or the Tallinn Cinema Studio), to art, but it was his teaching work (Tallinn Culture University, Tallinn Pedagogical Institute, the State Art Institute of the Estonian SSR) that was the most important thing to him during his life. His most prolific creative period was definitely the 1960s, when he developed his signature style as an artist.

On the picture: Raivo Korstnik. Red Kunda

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514.t1.jpg Edgar Valter. A Summer Night’s Dream

Järvi Pust, gallerist at Haus Gallery

Edgar Valter (1929–2006) is a familiar name to almost every Estonian and they definitely know more than just his name, because as a book illustrator he has given looks visible to the eye to a number of characters, who have been companions for many generations during their years of growing up and often even later. As an artist, Edgar Valter was a completely self-taught person. He graduated a non-complete high school (6–7 years) as a child of a large family in 1945 in Tallinn, and his working life started immediately after that. He worked as a sailor, painter and in many other valuable positions as well.

On the picture: Edgar Valter. A Summer Night’s Dream

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513.t1.jpg About the spiritual life of art business

Piia Ausman, head of Haus Gallery

One of the clearest and most read tools of the art business is the art auction. There are more auctions in today’s world than we can guess. These have become one of the most common and sure ways to sell and buy art.

On the picture: Gerhard Richter's „Abstraktes Bild“ at the Sotheby’s auction . Photo: Sotheby’s

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496.t1.jpg Art of Blue, Black and White

Triinu Soikmets, gallerist and curator at Haus Gallery

The reflection of the blue sky on lake water, black soil, and white birch bark. Loyalty to ideals, an ethnic coat, and a spiritual light. Both sets of triplets represent the current – the tricolour raised in honour of the birthday of the Republic. These three colours, which 99 years ago symbolized freedom and sanctity, have been brought out once again after being under the red floor, and not only. These can now be freely played with.

On the picture: Mall Nukke, "Exercise With the Blue I-II"

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498.t1.jpg Glass Cluster Game

Triinu Soikmets, gallerist and curator at Haus Gallery

If optimists see the glass as half full and pessimists see it as half empty, then for the realist, the glass is always a glass and if there is something inside, then it is obviously full. There are undoubtedly optimists, pessimists as well as realists amongst artists, but let us this time allow literal glass artists to speak on the topic of glass.

On the picture: Andra Jõgis’ “Letters home” and Laurentsius’ “Mapplethorpe calla III-2” (fragment). Photo: Rait Lõhmus

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500.t1.jpg Tallinn Tuesday gallery evening on March 28

TMW Arts, organized by the Estonian Contemporary Art Development Center (ECADC), will host a gallery evening called Tallinn Tuesday with a special program and extended opening hours on March 28 from 5pm to 9pm. The program will start at Haus Gallery where is possible to meet artist Mall Nukke and visit her exhibition "TriColorGames".

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503.t1.jpg Five hours at five galleries

Triinu Soikmets, gallerist and curator at Haus Gallery

Would you like to be up to date with contemporary art but there are too many places this could be seen at? Would you like to understand what you are looking at better, but conceptual art works and deep philosophical wall texts make your head ache? There is a solution for this problem – a number of galleries can be visited in one night within the framework of Tallinn Tuesdays, in which artists and gallerists introduce their exhibitions, and in a few cases they are also accompanied by musicians.

On the picture: Niña Yhared, "Via Baltic" at Okapi Gallery. Photo: Kadi-Ell Tähiste

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504.t1.jpg The forest portraits of Jane Remm

On Friday, 31 March at 18, “Forest. Portraits.” – the exhibition by the painter Jane Remm – will open at Haus Gallery. The successive protagonist of the enchanting paintings is the forest in its different forms, its rhythms, wild mazes, and a closer look has been given to single stems.

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494.t1.jpg Sculpture Story

Järvi Pust, gallerist and art consultant at Haus Gallery

“You know it is so difficult with sculptures,” I say to one of the respected sculptors of Estonia, who has come to show his work in the gallery. “Yes, it is like a crop failure,” he sighs back. Of course generalization is very foolish and there are definitely sculptors whose works people line up to see, but I feel as if an Estonian does not know what to do with a sculpture.

On the picture: Rait Prääts, “Oskar C8”

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488.t1.jpg The artist behind the Moomins or a painter?

Piia Ausman, head of Haus Gallery

How well do we actually know the people behind their famous names? Those who have created art that has become signified in itself, existing a priori, as if it would have been here for us just like this from the very beginning. We equate the artist with their art—thinking of any famous author, we first picture their works, not their face or them as a human.

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486.t1.jpg Orest Kormashov: truth cannot be ugly

Järvi Pust, gallerist and art consultant at Haus Gallery

“Moment” – an exhibition of paintings by Orest Kormashov – will be open at the Haus Gallery until February 14. The exhibited works were inspired by a trip to Southern Italy. Orest Kormashov is an artist, for whom an exhibition full of new works is something quite infrequent and exceptional, and because he is also a lecturer and an icon restorer – and in order to be able to focus exclusively on his creative work – he needs to take some time and leave his usual environment for a while. Orest is from an environment that was, quite literally, soaked to the core with art. His parents are/were artists (painter Nikolai Kormashov and ceramist Luule Kormashova). His brother, Andrei (graphic artist and designer), and wife, Jaana (ceramist), are also artists. A moment of happiness such as this, when we have an opportunity to present an experienced person with such a witty and interesting background, must be used in order to have a little talk with him. We started from the beginning, and eventually got to that which was most important – responsibility and creativity.

On the picture: Orest Kormashov. Photo: Endel Apsalon

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484.t1.jpg A grand stage for art – BRAFA 2017

Piia Ausman, head of Haus Gallery

Art gives performances – exhibitions, exhibitions. Thousands and thousands of them are opened in the galleries of different cities around the world, reflecting the efforts of artists and curators to create harmony, objections or modern worlds speaking in separate thinking spaces. Exhibitions in important museums focus on a certain artist, epoch or on the overview of a country's artistic values. Private museums demonstrate the preferences of the collectors through their collections, etc. Art is a powerful performance, a vast medium, like a theatrical stage, the size of which is better understood by visiting its art fairs – Grand Galas!

On the picture: David Rijckaert II, "Still life with trays of oysters, dried fruit, chestnuts and sweets"

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482.t1.jpg Twelve recommendations from the stars

Triinu Soikmets and Järvi Pust, gallerists at the Haus Gallery

Where can you find money, happiness and love? What can you do to make sure that none of it ever ends? Should one look for help from crystals, pour tin, or be the master of one’s own destiny? As we wrote about three New Year’s wishes in the art hall last time, then this time we will be sharing recommendations for the 12 zodiac signs, on how to make the stars to work to your advantage forever – all with the help of art!

On the picture: Endel Kõks, "Self portrait"

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447.t1.jpg Juss Piho. STORIES WITHIN OURSELVES

Haus Gallery has curated an exhibition "Stories Within Ourselves" of paintings by Juss Piho in restaurant Art Priori. With this exhibition, restaurant is presenting contemporary Estonian paintings, offering a fun change of pace from the displays thus far, where the focus was mostly on the history of art and classical sentiments.

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477.t1.jpg Orest Kormašov. MOMENT

On Tuesday, 10 January, the exhibition "Moment", by Orest Kormashov, will open in the Haus Gallery. The exhibited works were born on the basis of the impressions of Southern Italy. A few years ago, the artist, in cooperation with the gallery, exhibited moments from Rome – on this occasion it is the Basilicata region that is being represented.

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480.t1.jpg Three Wishes in the Art Hall

Järvi Pust, gallerist and art consultant at Haus Gallery

The beginning of the year has come to represent a sort of symbolic overlook, where one can stop and take a long look over one’s shoulder or attempt to peek behind the curves of the days and months ahead. It is here that others also stop and take stock of where they are and how they have reached this point. Wishes are made, witchcraft is engaged in, and in recent years the tradition of making New Year’s promises has also begun to rear its head; although, in connection with this, I am reminded here of my desk mate in school, who pledged every New Year to never be late to school, usually managing to keep this promise for about five days. I have always tried to steer clear of such holiday promises because I know that life will interfere with the best of intentions sooner or later, and that is why I prefer to give promises to specific people and on specific topics. Instead, I have made wishes; as doing so seems somewhat more ebullient and less restrictive, especially if you are wishing for liberation from something.

On the picture: Rein Kelpman, "Dancing Lesson"

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476.t1.jpg The art of being an observer

Piia Ausman, head of Haus Gallery

When we stop and look at something for an extended period of time, time also stops for a moment. We look, and time looks with us. But what about our thoughts? Do our thoughts stop where we do? Does our imagination keep walking on the landscape that we see? No – our thoughts have their own chatty path, and there could be another picture in our imagination. This is how it often is. We are not one with what we are looking at nor do we perceive the moment in which we pause.

On the picture: Juss Piho, "Framed"

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475.t1.jpg Artist Jüri Mildeberg and writer Indrek Koff

Triinu Soikmets, gallerist and curator at Haus Gallery

A picture is worth a thousand words. However, sometimes a picture may prefer to remain silent while secretly wishing that there was somebody to see right through it. On a third occasion, thousands of words are frolicking in hundreds of stories, lightheartedly and without concern, albeit somewhat anxiously. Then the pen asks the bristles of the brush – or the other way round – out on a date, and after the initial excitement they both discover that when they draw lines, side by side, new sounds start resonating between them.

On the picture: Jüri Mildeberg, series "Stories of A Hundred Nations"

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472.t1.jpg Art and meetings. Eduard, Jaak and Kaido

Järvi Pust, gallerist and art consultant at Haus Gallery

Art brings people together and not just to exhibitions and museum halls. Art may be a connection and link between the course of life and the destiny of people, and in the middle of the most ordinary of days.

On the picture: Eduard Ole, “Wintry Harjumägi”

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